Event

Solutions for Improving Efficiency in Power Electronics Systems

Darryl Tschirhart
Wednesday, June 28, 2017
13:00
ME4124

Abstract: Power electronics is an enabling technology required by all modern electronic systems. In most cases, the power distribution network is quite complex and usually composed of a number of power converters that sequentially condition the energy from the source to a form required by the load. To achieve the end goals of maximizing the functionality of the systems with low energy cost; efficient high frequency operation of the converters is required. As the total efficiency is the product of all converters in the power processing path, reducing power loss of all stages is necessary, but reducing the number of stages potentially yields the greatest benefit to the overall system. This presentation is a composition of ideas all aiming to improve the performance of power converters and systems. New circuits, design strategies, and control methods will be introduced to meet these objectives.

 

Biography: Darryl Tschirhart received the B.Sc. (with honours), M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada, in 2003, 2006, and 2012 respectively.

In May 2010 he joined the Advanced Power Engineering Team at Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) where he was responsible for power requirement roadmaps and new product development of high performance single and multiphase voltage regulators for next generation graphical- and central processing units. In February 2013 he joined Infineon Technologies as a Concept Engineer in the digital IC group where he works on functional blocks for controller ICs for multiphase, multi-loop voltage regulators and isolated dc/dc topologies.

Dr. Tschirhart has received the Best Presentation Award at the International Symposium on Industrial Electronics in 2006 (ISIE’06), twice at the Applied Power Electronics Conference in 2010 (APEC’10) and the Favourite Teaching Assistant Award in 2004 and 2005. He has 16 papers published in IEEE conferences and journals; 5 granted US patents, 1 granted Canadian patent, and 17 US patent applications covering IC level circuits, board-level system improvements, and power converter control.

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